Brien Holden Vision Institute and Eyezone Institute-Kuwait conduct slit lamp training in Jordan

Eyezone Blog-Eyezone Institute Slit Lamp Training Course

Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, in collaboration with Brien Holden Vision Institute, orchestrated a two-day slit lamp skills training session held on November 16-17, 2017 at the Jordan Optometric Syndicate, Amman. The team of Eyezone Institute faculty members namely, Dr. Nezar Damati (Executive Director) and Mr. Moayad Al Deek (Assistant Training Director), covered various topics, such as, setting up of the slit lamp, patient and illumination system, examining the eye, as well as, hands-on workshop sessions where the trainees were able to examine patients, among others. Read more

Unified effort to beat trachoma

French-speaking countries in West Africa joined forces to eliminate trachoma, the world’s leading cause of infectious blindness, under a new initiative spearheaded by The Task Force’s International Trachoma Initiative (ITI). Representatives discussed funding, logistics, and supply-chain management issues around the mass drug administration of antibiotic for eliminating trachoma as a public health problem. Read more

Eyes into our small world: Nikon’s Small World Photomicrography Competition 2017

Eyezone Blog - Eyes into the small world - Image 2

Running in its 43rd year, Nikon’s Small World Photomicrography Competition is a science-focused photography competition that magnifies on anything that goes on under the microscope. With more than 2,000 entries from 88 different countries in 2017, the winning entries narrowed down to three prize winners, including 85 honorable mentions. Read more

Genes may be responsible for sight loss

Eyezone Blog - Genes may be responsible for sight loss-compressed

In a conference held in Edinburgh titled “Eye Development and Degeneration 2017”, scientists said that they have identified chemical changes in the eye that can lead to blindness. Their findings aid understanding of a genetic condition that causes sight loss for one in 3,000 people in the UK.  Read more

New interactive course for optometrists to launch in Kuwait

Promoted content

Eyezone Blog-Eyezone Institute-Refraction Course 2017

Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, in collaboration with Brien Holden Vision Institute, is initiating a specialized refraction standardisation training in Kuwait. The ‘Refraction Standardisation Course’ is designed to refresh optometrists’ skills and knowledge in conducting refraction and prescribing spectacles. This three-month training program involves face-to-face workshop (theoretical and practical), supervised practice, theory and competency exams, as well as, practical sessions led by Eyezone Institute faculty, side by side guest trainers from Brien Holden Vision Institute. Classes will open on July 15, 2017. For registration or inquiry, visit Eyezone Institute’s website or call 22204300.

 

Here comes the sun, keep your eyes safe

Eyezone Blog-Here comes the sun, keep your eyes safe

 

July is UV Safety Month

UV radiation can damage your eyes as well as your skin. Studies suggest that overexposure to UV radiation can cause eye cataracts, eye damage, and suppression of the immune system, in general. May they be your family, friends, or colleagues – everyone is equally at risk for eye damage due to overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation.

The sun’s UV rays can burn the cornea of your eyes, which can result in cataracts that may ultimately cause blindness. Even short periods of exposure can lead to serious damage. Read more

Eyes see you: How your eyes can read your neighbor’s mind

Eyezone Blog-Eyes see you-Your eyes can read your neighbors mind-mari-lezhava-265675-compressed
Photo credit: mari lezhava

 

Twenty years ago, a team of scientists at the University of Cambridge developed a test of ‘cognitive empathy’ called the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ Test (or the Eyes Test, for short). This revealed that people can rapidly interpret what another person is thinking or feeling from looking at their eyes alone. It also showed that some of us are better at this than others, and that women on average score better on this test than men. Read more

Blind people “see” through brain maps

Eyezone Blog-Blind people have brain map for 'visual' observations too

Is what you’re looking at an object, a face, or a tree? When processing visual input, our brain uses different areas to recognize faces, body parts, scenes, and objects. Scientists at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have now shown that people who were born blind use a ‘brain map’ with a very similar layout to distinguish between these same categories.

Our brain only needs a split second to determine what we’re seeing. The area in our brain that can categorize these visual observations so quickly is the so-called ventral-temporal cortex, the visual brain. Like a map, this region is divided into smaller regions, each of which recognizes a particular category of observations — faces, body parts, scenes, and objects. Read more

World Council of Optometry marks 90 years advocacy

Eyezone Blog-WOC-90th anniversary
 World Council of Optometry

Originally founded in Cologne, Germany in 1927 as the International Optical League (Ligue Internationale d’optique), The World Council of Optometry (WCO) marked its 90th anniversary on March 7, 2017.

Headquartered at the American Optometric Association offices in St. Louis, Missouri, the WCO is the only global optometric body in official relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners with many eye care organizations which share the same goal of high-quality eye health and vision care being accessible to all people.

WCO serves in the development of optometry around the world and supports optometrists in promoting eye health and vision care as a human right through advocacy, education, policy development and humanitarian outreach worldwide.

The WCO collectively represents over 200,000 optometrists in almost 60 countries through over 200 affiliates, associate, corporate and individual memberships across six world regions: Africa, Asia-Pacific, Eastern Mediterranean, Europe, Latin America and North America. Having a long history of worldwide leadership, past WCO presidents have come from countries all over the world including Australia, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Nigeria, Norway, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Switzerland and the United States.

“Next to life itself is the gift of vision,” WCO President Uduak Udom explained. “The beauty all around, which just amazes us, comes through vision. Most of our learning comes through vision. For these and many more reasons, optometrists around the world are committed to the cause of a world where high-quality eye health and vision care is accessible to all people.”

WCO will be hosting the 2nd World Congress of Optometry to be held in Hyderabad, India from September 11-13, 2017, in partnership with the Asia Pacific Council of Optometry (APCO) and the India Vision Institute (IVI). The central theme of the meeting, Accessible, Quality Vision and Eye Health complements the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan of Universal Eye Health with a goal of universal access to comprehensive eye care services.

Preserving vision for astronauts

Eyezone Blog-Preserving vision for astronauts
JAXA astronaut Koichi Wakata sits in the chin rest during an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) session on ISS. Credit: NASA

Many astronauts who come back from space experience poorer vision after flight, some even years after, and researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are working to see why.

Brian Samuels, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology, and his fellow collaborators from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University recently received a grant to study computational modeling as a method of determining why astronauts who are in space for extended periods of time are experiencing eye pathologies. Samuels is collaborating with scientists at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and others, to help identify the cause of these pathologies, and determine whether there is a way to intervene and prevent these types of vision complications in the future.

“We know that, if astronauts are in space for extended amounts of time, they have a higher propensity for developing pathologies similar to increased intracranial pressure,” Samuels said. “We are trying to incorporate all of the existing clinical and research data into functional computational models of the eye itself, the central nervous system and the cardiovascular system to determine how they are interacting.”

He says these computational models should answer some of the questions as to “why this is happening to our astronauts.”

The length of time astronauts stayed in space changed in the mid-2000s when the International Space Station started being used. Space shuttle missions typically lasted two weeks, but now the ISS missions may last six months or longer. Astronauts were no longer going up to space and quickly coming back down to Earth.

It was around this time the scientific community noticed that longer durations in space, in microgravity, caused a larger propensity for changes in the eye.

Many astronauts who experience these vision issues are encountering a hyperopic shift in their vision, meaning they gradually become farsighted. Astronauts can develop folds in the retina, experience swelling of the optic disk and also have distention of the optic nerve sheath behind the eye. Some astronauts who have returned from a mission are still experiencing vision issues five years later. Samuels and his colleagues believe there may be some permanent remodeling changes in the eye after extended periods of time in space.

“Given that one of NASA’s primary goals is to send someone to Mars, this will be the longest amount of time humans have spent in space thus far,” Samuels said. “If we are able to identify risk factors that might predispose someone to these types of issues in space, the computational models could become a screening tool for future astronauts.”

Samuels says he also wants to find the direct cause behind these eye pathologies in an effort to develop tools to halt this process for astronauts in space.

“If an astronaut is six months from coming home and is already experiencing vision-related issues, we want to temporize any further damage that may occur,” he said.

Samuels’ role in this project is to interpret clinical and research data that informs the computational modeling and relay back to the other investigators whether the output data obtained from the models is realistic. As a clinician-scientist, he can take information that is gathered from research studies, clinical studies and computational modeling in the lab, and compare it to real-world scenarios in a clinic.

C. Ross Ethier, Ph.D., professor and interim chair of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, is the project lead.

“Dr. Samuels helps ground us in clinical reality by relating effects in space to clinical conditions on Earth, detailing pathophysiologic processes at the cellular level to clinical outcomes,” Ethier said. “He is an incredible resource for our team and the broader space physiology community.”

Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2017, February 27). Preserving vision for astronauts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 7, 2017 from Science Daily.