To lead research project for Trachoma Elimination IAPB


The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is to lead a major new research project that aims to accelerate the elimination of trachoma. The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) is an alliance of civil society organisations, corporates and professional bodies promoting eye health through advocacy, knowledge and partnerships.
Organisation: IAPB
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#KidsTakeOver Universal Children’s Day 2017

Eyezone Blog-KidsTakeOver Universal Children's Day 2017

Every 20th of November, the United Nations promotes international togetherness in spreading awareness among children worldwide and improving children’s welfare with the Universal Children’s Day. Celebrated since 1990, it is the date the UN General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child in 1959, as well as, the Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1989. Read more

July is dry eye awareness month

Eyezone Blog-NEI-Diagram of lacrimal gland meiobmian gland and layers of tear film

 

Recent strides toward understanding dry eye are leading to better and longer-lasting therapies for the millions of people in the U.S. who are affected by the condition.

Current therapies for dry eye provide symptomatic relief: steroids control inflammation, antibiotics counter infection, and artificial tears replenish moisture. But such approaches give only short-term relief for some people and require frequent reapplication. They also fail to address the underlying causes of dry eye. Read more

Working on a global mission to improve children’s eyesight

Eyezone Blog-Essilor Change-2-resized

Four years ago, Essilor, the market leader in ophthalmic optics with the mission to improve lives by improving sight, created dedicated teams to reach the 2.5 billion people across the globe who don’t have access to the vision correction they need. Since then, Essilor has launched and scaled-up new inclusive business models and deployed many non-profit initiatives to improve access to vision care in developing (and developed) nations. Read more

Yateem Eye Center and Day Care Surgery Opens in Khalifa City

UAE’s most advanced eye care center – Yateem Eye Center and Day Care Surgery – was launched on April 16th in Khalifa City A, Abu Dhabi by His Highness Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Minister of Culture, Youth, and Social Development.

The Yateem Eye Center and Day Care Surgery, is a highly-specialized health care center with world-class facilities and a team of medical professionals with strong clinical expertise.

The launch marks a major milestone in the healthcare sector of UAE. With an ever increasing usage of digital devices, the dry environmental conditions, increasing prevalence of diabetes and health complications; vision related complications are on the rise.

The Yateem brand has been synonymous with high quality eye care in GCC since 1910. The Yateem Eye Center, is the brainchild of UAE’s leading optical expert; Nasser A Yateem. As the Vice Chairman of Yateem Opticians retail optical chain, he identified the need for a specialty eye care center in UAE to meet the needs of the growing population in the region.

The Eye Center is one of the largest specialty centers in UAE and caters to patients from both Dubai and Abu Dhabi. Residents of UAE can now experience the latest in diagnostic/therapeutic technologies by skilled professionals, under one roof. The facility also houses a family medicine clinic, a dedicated pharmacy and optical retail unit.

Priorities for glaucoma care in Sub-Saharan Africa

Eyezone Blog-Priorities for glaucoma care in Sub-Saharan Africa
Applanation tonometry: accurate measurement of intraocular pressure is important in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma/ Photo credits: Gabriel Entekume

 

Glaucoma affects at least one in every 25 people aged 40 years and above in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It occurs as a result of the intraocular pressure (eye pressure [IOP]) being too high for the normal functioning of the optic nerve which is responsible for sight. Despite the vision loss that it causes, over half of the people with glaucoma are unaware and this is reflected in their late presentation in seeking care. A staggering 50% have already lost vision in one eye and are at high risk of losing vision in the second eye by the time they seek treatment.

There are three main modalities for treatment of glaucoma: medical, surgical or laser therapy. The choice of intervention currently depends on several factors related to the patient: stage/severity at presentation, compliance with health instruction, socio-economic status influencing ability to afford medicines and care, and residence in relation to follow-up. For example, the literate relative of a medical doctor may have medical therapy with 3-monthly follow-up; whereas for a rural non-schooled farmer, the better option may be a one-off surgical treatment (trabeculectomy) with follow-up in the local health centre.

The aim of treatment is to lower the IOP in order to prevent or slow down further vision loss, as any vision already lost cannot be restored. The prognosis when explained is often a source of anxiety to the newly diagnosed patients. Some patients do not accept their diagnosis nor comply with the treatment plan nor accept the prognosis. This leads them to seek multiple opinions in different hospitals, hopping and hoping.

Mrs CP is a 61-year old woman diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma:

“The vision impairment came in my adulthood. In fact, I did not know I had vision impairment, it came quite slowly. Now they say I have to use eye drops for the rest of my life. I cannot even find the drugs to buy and when I find they are so expensive, I cannot afford to buy. Even putting the eye drops is a problem as much of it runs down my face. And it stings.

My vision has worsened. I am tired. I have gone around so many eye clinics without any improvement. In fact, the teaching hospital is worst. I can hardly see and I was asked to go to so many points, pay so many times, wait for so long before I could see the specialist. And to think I have to do this for the rest of my life…Ah!!

I was already blind in one eye and the other eye is also going. Now they said I should have operation in my better eye… God forbid bad thing!! Let me just manage, when I have the money, I will buy the eye drops from the chemist.”

It is, therefore, imperative that we set our current priorities to:

1. Optimising treatment and patients’ care – i.e. doing the best for those who seek care.

2. Responding to patients’ perspectives with patients’ participation.

Strengthening clinical services would include training in surgical skills, laser procedures and building teams for optimal glaucoma care, for better treatment outcomes. Ensuring that effective medicines are available within well-equipped centres would also expand the treatment choices. Additionally, national guidelines and protocols would be helpful in optimising the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

Population-based surveys in SSA indicate that only about 10% of glaucoma patients seek hospital treatment. Additionally, there is a challenge in keeping patients within the health care system. To engage the patient, there should be counselling to enhance their understanding of the disease and encourage participation of the patient in their choice of therapy and compliance with treatment. The ease of financing mechanisms for their treatment is also important. Additional efforts should be geared towards providing a pleasant hospital experience so that a follow-up visit would entail a one-stop shop.

Eye care providers working together with patients with glaucoma will enhance better treatment outcomes in SSA and together they can be BIG; Beat Invisible Glaucoma.

 

The article above was written by Fatima Kyari, Consultant Ophthalmologist, IAPB West Africa Chair.

Source: IAPB

Free vision screenings for quality vision

Eyezone Blog-Free vision screenings for quality vision

CHICAGO (March, 2017) – Prevent Blindness, the oldest volunteer eye health and safety group in the USA, and Allergan (NYSE: AGN), a global leader in eye care for nearly 70 years, have embarked on a joint effort to promote healthy vision. As part of their recently launched ‘See America’ initiative, Allergan is working with Prevent Blindness to sponsor vision screening events across the country to help provide adults with access to quality vision care. As well as learning about the leading causes of preventable blindness and vision loss, attendees will receive a free Prevent Blindness certified vision screening, referral to professional eye care and financial assistance as needed.

According to the recent Prevent Blindness study, “The Future of Vision, Forecasting the Prevalence and Costs of Vision Problems,” vision loss in the United States is projected to grow by 135 percent from 4.4 million to more than 10 million people by 2050.

Along with the increase in the prevalence of vision problems, the total real cost of vision problems is expected to increase by 157 percent from $145 billion in 2014 to $373 billion by 2050.

“We cannot wait any longer to address America’s vision health threats,” said Herm Cukier, Senior Vice President of Eye Care at Allergan, who is leading the See America initiative. “By working together with groups like Prevent Blindness, we can directly impact individuals who are at-risk for vision problems and those who are currently experiencing vision loss. Through education and direct access to vision care, we can fight against preventable blindness and vision impairment.”

See America’s commitment to increasing awareness of diseases that cause preventable blindness extends beyond these initial one day events, as Allergan is providing support for ongoing program initiatives in the communities Prevent Blindness serves.

“Prevent Blindness thanks Allergan for their valued partnership and continued commitment to vision and eye health programs,” said Hugh R. Parry, President and CEO of Prevent Blindness. “Working with our affiliates around the country, the See America program will make a tremendous impact toward protecting the precious gift of sight.”

Source: Optical Vision Site

New optical business directory hits the web

Eyezone Blog-Optiguide launchKuwait: EYEZONE Magazine, the first optical magazine in the Middle East, has launched a comprehensive online directory called Eyezone Optiguide. It covers a whole gamut of data relevant in building optical business transactions such as a company’s basic info plus its overview, contact details, route maps, brand and product features, images, and videos, in addition to a plethora of upcoming optical shows and latest industry news. The directory has gone live on January 26, 2017 and can be accessed at www.optiguide.eyezonemag.com.

Aside from housing company basic portfolios and brand presentations, Eyezone Optiguide also publishes a chunkful of recent happenings within the optical market and are available in a straightforward, easy to use platform and search capabilities. The site serves as a helpful resource for companies in search for their ideal clients.

The listing is categorized as follows: frames and sunglasses, kids’ eyewear, ophthalmic lenses, clear and colored contact lenses, equipment, accessories, and decor. Moreover, the site offers an All In One Map for quick location-based lookup and a Help Center detailing the how-tos of the site. Eyezone Optiguide is also accessible on mobile devices and is surely promising to become a gold mine of optical business essentials worldwide.

 

Stronger together for our children


Eyezone Blog-World Sight Day 2016-OCV-Eyezone Institute

Image source:  facebook.com/ourchildrensvision

In observance of World Sight Day 2016, Our Children’s Vision, in collaboration with Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, joined hands to raise awareness of vision impairment worldwide. Following IAPB‘s lead of the call to action, #StrongerTogether, Our Children’s Vision demonstrates that their partners have a common goal and are committed to working together to achieve it. The feature video includes great comments from some of the global leaders in optical education, research, and health initiatives: Peter Ackland, Maureen Cavanagh, Susan Cooper, Clive Miller, Howard Purcell, Kovin Naidoo, Amanda Davis, Kim Schuy, and Jayanth Bhuvaraghan.

The message was passed across various social media platforms of Our Children’s Vision and Eyezone Institute. Check out some highlights of the campaign posts.

 

Click the thumbnails to expand the images.

WSD: Stronger together


EYEZONE Blog-World Sight Day 2016World Sight Day (WSD) is an annual day of awareness held on the second Thursday of October, to focus global attention on blindness and vision impairment.

2016 is the fourth year of the WHO Global Action Plan and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), an umbrella organisation that conducts international efforts and mobilizes resources for blindness prevention activities, encourages its members and partners to continue with its rolling theme which is Universal Eye Health.

This year, the ‘Call to Action’ for World Sight Day is Stronger Together.

WSD is co-ordinated by IAPB under the VISION 2020 Global Initiative. The theme and certain core materials are generated by IAPB. All events are organised independently by members and supporter organisations.

Source:  IAPB