Brien Holden Vision Institute and Eyezone Institute-Kuwait conduct slit lamp training in Jordan

Eyezone Blog-Eyezone Institute Slit Lamp Training Course

Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, in collaboration with Brien Holden Vision Institute, orchestrated a two-day slit lamp skills training session held on November 16-17, 2017 at the Jordan Optometric Syndicate, Amman. The team of Eyezone Institute faculty members namely, Dr. Nezar Damati (Executive Director) and Mr. Moayad Al Deek (Assistant Training Director), covered various topics, such as, setting up of the slit lamp, patient and illumination system, examining the eye, as well as, hands-on workshop sessions where the trainees were able to examine patients, among others. Read more

July is dry eye awareness month

Eyezone Blog-NEI-Diagram of lacrimal gland meiobmian gland and layers of tear film

 

Recent strides toward understanding dry eye are leading to better and longer-lasting therapies for the millions of people in the U.S. who are affected by the condition.

Current therapies for dry eye provide symptomatic relief: steroids control inflammation, antibiotics counter infection, and artificial tears replenish moisture. But such approaches give only short-term relief for some people and require frequent reapplication. They also fail to address the underlying causes of dry eye. Read more

Blind people “see” through brain maps

Eyezone Blog-Blind people have brain map for 'visual' observations too

Is what you’re looking at an object, a face, or a tree? When processing visual input, our brain uses different areas to recognize faces, body parts, scenes, and objects. Scientists at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have now shown that people who were born blind use a ‘brain map’ with a very similar layout to distinguish between these same categories.

Our brain only needs a split second to determine what we’re seeing. The area in our brain that can categorize these visual observations so quickly is the so-called ventral-temporal cortex, the visual brain. Like a map, this region is divided into smaller regions, each of which recognizes a particular category of observations — faces, body parts, scenes, and objects. Read more

Is your optometrist ready for the AI-future on its way?

Eyezone Blog-Is Your Optometrist Ready for the AI-future On Its Way-WCEA

For many it’s a simple choice – if you have problems with your eyesight, see an optometrist. As we get older, most of us will probably need glasses, particularly for those that spent most of the working life hunched over a computer all day long. But this once seemingly straightforward profession of optometry is changing, rapidly. And these changes which are coming to the field of optometry may very well signal things to come in other areas of health service as well. Read more

Are your listening? Your pupils indicate if you are

EYEZONE Blog-Are your listening-Your pupils indicate if you are-2

A new Dartmouth study finds that listeners are most likely to tune in when a speaker delivers the most emotional peaks of his/her narrative, as revealed by synchronous pupil dilation patterns of speakers and listeners due to shared attention.

The findings also demonstrate how empathy comes into play. While listeners with both high and low empathy tuned in for the climax of a story, overall, listeners with higher empathy tuned in more. Read more

Advancing optometry education in the Middle East and North Africa

Eyezone Blog-Advancing optometry education in Middle East and North Africa

Image source: Eyezone Institute of Opticianry Facebook page

Islamabad, Pakistan, 20 April 2017: Brien Holden Vision Institute Academy, Australia, and Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, Kuwait, sealed a long-term partnership to drive the common goal of “increasing the delivery of optometry education in Middle Eastern and North African regions”.

Brien Holden Vision Institute Academy, a global leader in eye care services, education, and training, believes that “education and training are the only way to build the capacity necessary to affect change by increasing the global optometric workforce”. The Academy aims for effective and sustainable global eye health, hand in hand with Eyezone Institute, a Kuwait-based training center delivering continuing professional education in optical sciences, as well as, advanced soft skills courses across the region.

Sumrana Yasmin, Regional Director, Southeast Asia and Eastern Mediterranean, Brien Holden Vision Institute, spoke with excitement about the new joint venture. “I greatly believe in drawing on new collaborations and strategies which can elevate the current situation to new heights of progress and success – I am very pleased about this new partnership as I know our new colleagues are committed to the evolution of eye health for our region,” she said. The venture seeks to extend a shared reach through eye health and optometric education to benefit prospective students and eye care professionals.

By initially integrating established curriculum and methodologies from Brien Holden Vision Institute, the venture promises quality optometric education for eye care professionals attending Eyezone Institute. Faculty members at the Institute will undergo training by the Academy’s education experts across all aspects of delivering the educational programs, including advice on curriculum, working to enhance infrastructure, and providing educational resources.

Mr. Ali Bandoor, CEO, Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, when speaking about the partnership, said: “Eyezone Institute’s mission is to develop first class training modules and methodologies tailor-made to benefit the various sectors of the optical industry. Our new joint venture with Brien Holden Vision Institute Academy comes at an opportune time and we are very excited at the new possibilities and wealth of knowledge possible with this alliance.”

The collaboration will also address the rapidly evolving optical technologies through the delivery of cutting-edge courses, both face-to-face and online, offering a broader perspective and evidence-based curriculum from Brien Holden Vision Institute.

Amélie Morel elected President of Silmo

Amélie Morel, President, Silmo Paris

The Board of Directors of the Silmo Association, the founding proprietor of the Silmo Paris Exhibition, has unanimously elected Amélie Morel as the new Silmo Paris president.

Communications Director for the Morel company which has embodied the know-how of the French eyewear industry for more than 130 years, Amélie Morel will take the helm of this major optics and eyewear event which this year is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The 4th generation to manage the family business alongside her brothers Jérôme and Francis, Amélie Morel received a resounding vote of confidence from the association’s Board to continue the work of promoting both the Silmo Exhibition and the industry, previously carried out by Philippe Lafont who passed away suddenly in March.

For the past 50 years, Silmo Paris has been carving out a niche as the flagship trade fair for all optics and eyewear professionals. Under the impetus of successive presidents, Silmo has developed tools and promotional platforms to support the profession: Silmo d’Or awards, Silmo Academy, Trends Forum etc. True to its dynamic and innovative DNA, the blueprint for serving the needs of the profession, Silmo Paris will continue this momentum. At its head will be an ambassador for the French eyewear sector who combines a fresh approach with an extensive knowledge of both communications and the French and international eyewear markets.

Backed by a committed, close-knit team, Silmo Paris will work hard to complete all the projects initiated, in particular:

  • celebrating the 50th anniversary of the world’s leading optics and eyewear exhibition;
  • delivering constructive innovations to ensure the exhibition remains at the cutting edge of market developments;
  • meeting the expectations of exhibitors and visitors even more effectively in terms of business, socialising, creativity, training and innovation.

At the close of the Board meeting, Amélie Morel gave a statement: “This nomination represents an honour for the Morel family, and for me in particular. It is a demanding task, one that Philippe fulfilled with outstanding devotion and professionalism. The confidence and support expressed by all Board members will enable me to continue on the path initiated by Guy Charlot and ensure that Silmo Paris maintains its position at the forefront of the major international optics and eyewear exhibitions.”

Vision loss linked to depression

EYEZONE Blog-World Health Day 2017-Depression
Many studies show that some people with low vision are at risk of depression. 

The theme of World Health Day 2017 is depression. Various studies conducted by ophthalmologists and researchers show that adults with vision loss were 90 percent more likely to have clinical symptoms of major depression. In addition, they specified that the connection between vision loss and depression is likely to be “bidirectional,” with the disability worsening depression and depression exacerbating disability.

“Improved access to screening, diagnosis, and treatment of depression by eye care professionals and primary care providers may help to reduce the burden of depression-related excess disability and improve the quality of life among people with vision loss,” they noted.

Source: NCBI

Priorities for glaucoma care in Sub-Saharan Africa

Eyezone Blog-Priorities for glaucoma care in Sub-Saharan Africa
Applanation tonometry: accurate measurement of intraocular pressure is important in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma/ Photo credits: Gabriel Entekume

 

Glaucoma affects at least one in every 25 people aged 40 years and above in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It occurs as a result of the intraocular pressure (eye pressure [IOP]) being too high for the normal functioning of the optic nerve which is responsible for sight. Despite the vision loss that it causes, over half of the people with glaucoma are unaware and this is reflected in their late presentation in seeking care. A staggering 50% have already lost vision in one eye and are at high risk of losing vision in the second eye by the time they seek treatment.

There are three main modalities for treatment of glaucoma: medical, surgical or laser therapy. The choice of intervention currently depends on several factors related to the patient: stage/severity at presentation, compliance with health instruction, socio-economic status influencing ability to afford medicines and care, and residence in relation to follow-up. For example, the literate relative of a medical doctor may have medical therapy with 3-monthly follow-up; whereas for a rural non-schooled farmer, the better option may be a one-off surgical treatment (trabeculectomy) with follow-up in the local health centre.

The aim of treatment is to lower the IOP in order to prevent or slow down further vision loss, as any vision already lost cannot be restored. The prognosis when explained is often a source of anxiety to the newly diagnosed patients. Some patients do not accept their diagnosis nor comply with the treatment plan nor accept the prognosis. This leads them to seek multiple opinions in different hospitals, hopping and hoping.

Mrs CP is a 61-year old woman diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma:

“The vision impairment came in my adulthood. In fact, I did not know I had vision impairment, it came quite slowly. Now they say I have to use eye drops for the rest of my life. I cannot even find the drugs to buy and when I find they are so expensive, I cannot afford to buy. Even putting the eye drops is a problem as much of it runs down my face. And it stings.

My vision has worsened. I am tired. I have gone around so many eye clinics without any improvement. In fact, the teaching hospital is worst. I can hardly see and I was asked to go to so many points, pay so many times, wait for so long before I could see the specialist. And to think I have to do this for the rest of my life…Ah!!

I was already blind in one eye and the other eye is also going. Now they said I should have operation in my better eye… God forbid bad thing!! Let me just manage, when I have the money, I will buy the eye drops from the chemist.”

It is, therefore, imperative that we set our current priorities to:

1. Optimising treatment and patients’ care – i.e. doing the best for those who seek care.

2. Responding to patients’ perspectives with patients’ participation.

Strengthening clinical services would include training in surgical skills, laser procedures and building teams for optimal glaucoma care, for better treatment outcomes. Ensuring that effective medicines are available within well-equipped centres would also expand the treatment choices. Additionally, national guidelines and protocols would be helpful in optimising the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

Population-based surveys in SSA indicate that only about 10% of glaucoma patients seek hospital treatment. Additionally, there is a challenge in keeping patients within the health care system. To engage the patient, there should be counselling to enhance their understanding of the disease and encourage participation of the patient in their choice of therapy and compliance with treatment. The ease of financing mechanisms for their treatment is also important. Additional efforts should be geared towards providing a pleasant hospital experience so that a follow-up visit would entail a one-stop shop.

Eye care providers working together with patients with glaucoma will enhance better treatment outcomes in SSA and together they can be BIG; Beat Invisible Glaucoma.

 

The article above was written by Fatima Kyari, Consultant Ophthalmologist, IAPB West Africa Chair.

Source: IAPB

Free vision screenings for quality vision

Eyezone Blog-Free vision screenings for quality vision

CHICAGO (March, 2017) – Prevent Blindness, the oldest volunteer eye health and safety group in the USA, and Allergan (NYSE: AGN), a global leader in eye care for nearly 70 years, have embarked on a joint effort to promote healthy vision. As part of their recently launched ‘See America’ initiative, Allergan is working with Prevent Blindness to sponsor vision screening events across the country to help provide adults with access to quality vision care. As well as learning about the leading causes of preventable blindness and vision loss, attendees will receive a free Prevent Blindness certified vision screening, referral to professional eye care and financial assistance as needed.

According to the recent Prevent Blindness study, “The Future of Vision, Forecasting the Prevalence and Costs of Vision Problems,” vision loss in the United States is projected to grow by 135 percent from 4.4 million to more than 10 million people by 2050.

Along with the increase in the prevalence of vision problems, the total real cost of vision problems is expected to increase by 157 percent from $145 billion in 2014 to $373 billion by 2050.

“We cannot wait any longer to address America’s vision health threats,” said Herm Cukier, Senior Vice President of Eye Care at Allergan, who is leading the See America initiative. “By working together with groups like Prevent Blindness, we can directly impact individuals who are at-risk for vision problems and those who are currently experiencing vision loss. Through education and direct access to vision care, we can fight against preventable blindness and vision impairment.”

See America’s commitment to increasing awareness of diseases that cause preventable blindness extends beyond these initial one day events, as Allergan is providing support for ongoing program initiatives in the communities Prevent Blindness serves.

“Prevent Blindness thanks Allergan for their valued partnership and continued commitment to vision and eye health programs,” said Hugh R. Parry, President and CEO of Prevent Blindness. “Working with our affiliates around the country, the See America program will make a tremendous impact toward protecting the precious gift of sight.”

Source: Optical Vision Site