Drinking hot tea every day linked to lower glaucoma risk

Glaucoma causes fluid pressure to build up inside the eye (intraocular pressure), damaging the optic nerve. It is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide, and currently affects 57.5 million people, and is expected to increase to 65.5 million by 2020.
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Our children’s vision counts

WSD2017-Eyezone Blog

This day marks World Sight Day, and organizations from all corners of the optical industry around the world gather to make their voices count. World Sight Day (WSD) is an annual day of global awareness on blindness and vision impairment co-ordinated by IAPB under the VISION 2020 Global Initiative.

Based on a new global data report published by IAPB Vision Atlas, 253 million people are visually impaired while 89% of these people live in low- and middle-income countries. Moreover, localised and restricted environment in marginalized communities, such as ill-planned infrastructure and technological barriers, confers eye health challenges to children.  Read more

SAARC: From Darkness to Light

Eyezone Blog-Nepal Ophthalmic Society Logo
SAARC Academy of Ophthalmology Congress in Kathmandu 2018

Nepal Ophthalmic Society is hosting XIV SAARC Academy of Ophthalmology Congress in Kathmandu, Nepal from 21st to 24th June 2018.

More than 1000 Ophthalmologists, Optometrists and other cadre of eye care professional from eight SAARC countries, experts and speakers from all over the world, are expected to participate in this ophthalmic scientific gathering taking place in Himalayan Nation.

The theme of this congress is identified as “From Darkness to Light”.

Source: IAPB News

Vision loss linked to depression

EYEZONE Blog-World Health Day 2017-Depression
Many studies show that some people with low vision are at risk of depression. 

The theme of World Health Day 2017 is depression. Various studies conducted by ophthalmologists and researchers show that adults with vision loss were 90 percent more likely to have clinical symptoms of major depression. In addition, they specified that the connection between vision loss and depression is likely to be “bidirectional,” with the disability worsening depression and depression exacerbating disability.

“Improved access to screening, diagnosis, and treatment of depression by eye care professionals and primary care providers may help to reduce the burden of depression-related excess disability and improve the quality of life among people with vision loss,” they noted.

Source: NCBI

World Council of Optometry marks 90 years advocacy

Eyezone Blog-WOC-90th anniversary
 World Council of Optometry

Originally founded in Cologne, Germany in 1927 as the International Optical League (Ligue Internationale d’optique), The World Council of Optometry (WCO) marked its 90th anniversary on March 7, 2017.

Headquartered at the American Optometric Association offices in St. Louis, Missouri, the WCO is the only global optometric body in official relationship with the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners with many eye care organizations which share the same goal of high-quality eye health and vision care being accessible to all people.

WCO serves in the development of optometry around the world and supports optometrists in promoting eye health and vision care as a human right through advocacy, education, policy development and humanitarian outreach worldwide.

The WCO collectively represents over 200,000 optometrists in almost 60 countries through over 200 affiliates, associate, corporate and individual memberships across six world regions: Africa, Asia-Pacific, Eastern Mediterranean, Europe, Latin America and North America. Having a long history of worldwide leadership, past WCO presidents have come from countries all over the world including Australia, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Nigeria, Norway, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Switzerland and the United States.

“Next to life itself is the gift of vision,” WCO President Uduak Udom explained. “The beauty all around, which just amazes us, comes through vision. Most of our learning comes through vision. For these and many more reasons, optometrists around the world are committed to the cause of a world where high-quality eye health and vision care is accessible to all people.”

WCO will be hosting the 2nd World Congress of Optometry to be held in Hyderabad, India from September 11-13, 2017, in partnership with the Asia Pacific Council of Optometry (APCO) and the India Vision Institute (IVI). The central theme of the meeting, Accessible, Quality Vision and Eye Health complements the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Action Plan of Universal Eye Health with a goal of universal access to comprehensive eye care services.

New optical business directory hits the web

Eyezone Blog-Optiguide launchKuwait: EYEZONE Magazine, the first optical magazine in the Middle East, has launched a comprehensive online directory called Eyezone Optiguide. It covers a whole gamut of data relevant in building optical business transactions such as a company’s basic info plus its overview, contact details, route maps, brand and product features, images, and videos, in addition to a plethora of upcoming optical shows and latest industry news. The directory has gone live on January 26, 2017 and can be accessed at www.optiguide.eyezonemag.com.

Aside from housing company basic portfolios and brand presentations, Eyezone Optiguide also publishes a chunkful of recent happenings within the optical market and are available in a straightforward, easy to use platform and search capabilities. The site serves as a helpful resource for companies in search for their ideal clients.

The listing is categorized as follows: frames and sunglasses, kids’ eyewear, ophthalmic lenses, clear and colored contact lenses, equipment, accessories, and decor. Moreover, the site offers an All In One Map for quick location-based lookup and a Help Center detailing the how-tos of the site. Eyezone Optiguide is also accessible on mobile devices and is surely promising to become a gold mine of optical business essentials worldwide.

 

Can you sneeze with your eyes open?


eyezone-blog-can-you-sneez-with-eyes-open

The changing weather brings about many things: holiday excitement, a different wardrobe and — perhaps most annoyingly — cold and flu season. Those around you have likely been sneezing more frequently, which may have prompted you to ponder, perhaps while applying mascara or driving in bumper-to-bumper traffic, if it is possible to sneeze with your eyes open.

David Huston, MD, associate dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine Houston campus and an allergist at Houston Methodist Hospital, said it is “absolutely possible” to sneeze without closing the eyes, but most people tend to automatically close their eyes when sneezing. It is an autonomic reflex, which is an unconscious motor action in response to a stimulus: in this case, sneezing.

“The fact that it is possible to sneeze with the eyes open suggests that it is not hard-wired or mandatory,” Huston said. There is not definitive data as to why sneezing elicits a blinking response, but Huston and others speculate that it is reflective of a protective mechanism.

“The body works to rid its airways by sneezing when it detects irritating particles in the nose,” Huston said. “By automatically shutting the eyelids when a sneeze occurs, more irritants can potentially be prevented from entering and aggravating the eyes.”

Increased pressure from straining builds up in the blood vessels, not the eyes or muscles surrounding the eyes. This vascular pressure can result in ruptured capillaries, which are the body’s smallest blood vessels, that often manifest in the eyeballs or the face.

“For example, during childbirth, excessive straining can cause some veins to hemorrhage, leaving a mother’s eyes or face to appear red or markedly bruised,” Huston said, “but it is irresponsible to claim that such pressure could dislodge the eye from its socket.”

With cold and flu season in full force, there are a number of methods to protect others from the germs spewed when sneezing. “Although you can focus to keep your eyes open when sneezing, your body’s blinking response is likely there to protect itself from germs,” Huston said.

Texas A&M University. (2016, December 9). Can you sneeze with your eyes open? ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2016 from Science Daily.

Stronger together for our children


Eyezone Blog-World Sight Day 2016-OCV-Eyezone Institute

Image source:  facebook.com/ourchildrensvision

In observance of World Sight Day 2016, Our Children’s Vision, in collaboration with Eyezone Institute of Opticianry, joined hands to raise awareness of vision impairment worldwide. Following IAPB‘s lead of the call to action, #StrongerTogether, Our Children’s Vision demonstrates that their partners have a common goal and are committed to working together to achieve it. The feature video includes great comments from some of the global leaders in optical education, research, and health initiatives: Peter Ackland, Maureen Cavanagh, Susan Cooper, Clive Miller, Howard Purcell, Kovin Naidoo, Amanda Davis, Kim Schuy, and Jayanth Bhuvaraghan.

The message was passed across various social media platforms of Our Children’s Vision and Eyezone Institute. Check out some highlights of the campaign posts.

 

Click the thumbnails to expand the images.

WSD: Stronger together


EYEZONE Blog-World Sight Day 2016World Sight Day (WSD) is an annual day of awareness held on the second Thursday of October, to focus global attention on blindness and vision impairment.

2016 is the fourth year of the WHO Global Action Plan and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB), an umbrella organisation that conducts international efforts and mobilizes resources for blindness prevention activities, encourages its members and partners to continue with its rolling theme which is Universal Eye Health.

This year, the ‘Call to Action’ for World Sight Day is Stronger Together.

WSD is co-ordinated by IAPB under the VISION 2020 Global Initiative. The theme and certain core materials are generated by IAPB. All events are organised independently by members and supporter organisations.

Source:  IAPB

Nobel Prize: Optical Legacies

eyezone-blog-nobel-prizeOct 3, 2016: Announcement of winners of the Nobel Prize 2016 kicked off in the following categories: Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, Peace, and Economic Science. Yoshinori Ohsumi, a Japanese cell biologist, bagged the Nobel Laureate in Physiology and Medicine for his discovery of mechanisms for autophagy. While the announcements continue and as we await awardees in other categories, let’s take a glimpse of the optical industry’s major contributors to scientific development.

Allvar Gullstrand (1862-1930)

Gullstrand, a Swedish ophthalmologist, won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1911 for his study and research on “the eye as a light-refracting apparatus”. He contributed to knowledge of the structure and function of the cornea, as well as, to research studies on astigmatism. He also improved corrective lenses for use after surgery for cataracts and devised the Gullstrand slit lamp, a valuable diagnostic tool that facilitates detailed study of the eye. These investigations led to a new concept called “optical images”. Gullstrand was entirely self-taught in most of his geometric and physiological optic works. His major writings on physiological optics, along with his other works, received awards in various medical institutions.

Ragnar Granit (1900-1991), Haldan Keffer Hartline (1903-1983),

and George Wald (1906-1997)

In 1967, Granit, Hartline, and Wald jointly received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their contribution to the study of primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye. Hartline studied the inhibitory interaction in and the receptor properties of the Limulus retina. Wald discovered that Vitamin A is an important component of a light-sensitive substance in the retina, called rhodopsin, which is responsible for visual impressions in the brain. On the other hand, between the 1930s to 1950s, Granit studied the electrical impulses from the retina’s cells and demonstrated the different types of cones which are sensitive to light of three different wavelengths.

David H. Hubel (1926–2013)

In 1981, Hubel, a Canadian neurophysiologist, along with the Swedish neurophysiologist, Dr. Torsten Wiesel (1924), won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their contribution to the study of visual perception and sensory deprivation “by measuring the electrical impulses of cells in the visual cortex”. They discovered that “vision does not develop normally if the brain fails to make connections with the eye during a critical window early in life”. The discovery played a major role in the development of systems in treating cataracts of infants in order to prevent vision impairment in its early stages. The study also lead to the development of treatment of strabismus.

(Source: Agencies)